Asheville Farmstead School's

 Executive Director and Lead Teacher

Lauren Brown has her M. Ed. in Science Education, keeps her Wilderness First Responder certification current, is certified in the Cedarsong way of Forest Kindergarten teaching as well as a certificate in Environment, Education, and Community.  She has been passionately pursuing the Farmstead dream full time since May 2016!

Our Address

218 Morgan Cove Rd.
Candler, NC 28715

Contact Us

OUR STORY

The Farmstead Promise:
Asheville Farmstead School exists to foster experiences that unearth connection between nature, people, and sustainable food sources.  By celebrating individual diversity we lay the foundation for the empathy and kindness needed to create a village of life long learners. Our students learn skills to develop and care for the Earth, their fellow humans, and their own education. 

Vision: 

We envision a community where each time a child engages with nature, nature teaches the child in a way that sparks curiosity and cultivates respect.  Every time and adult connects with a child, the child teaches the adult about patience, play and wonder. Together these life long learners benefit from our community and appreciate the intrinsic value of the Earth.

The Farmstead:

Asheville Farmstead is honored to be stewards of a 25-acre tract of land in Candler, NC. When you drive up to the farm, you will look out over the permaculture-inspired garden, chicken coop,  fortville, and field. Behind the field sits our stone-built schoolhouse and yard.  Inside is complete with a craft room, student directed learning living room, peaceful room, and a naturally lit kitchen. The school yard is home to dirt kitchen, pine play, an in-ground trampoline, nature ninja course, hammocks, and more! Beyond the school yard lies the forested cove, with a creek, a spring, and a logging road that leads all the way to the ridge line.

 

As we grow together, this place will benefit from the imagination of creative minds and the dedication of little hands. We will mark trails, build forts and treehouses, turn over rocks, stack logs, change water patterns, pull up old plants, and install new ones, all while learning about the earth and each other.